LUCAS OIL STADIUM 

In the entry hall a huge football head caught our attention. A very nice lady introduced herself as our tour guide. First of all, she showed us the first floor where all the food stores are and also a wall full of football helmets which represents all of Indiana's highschool teams. After that an elevator took us upstairs to the quaterback suite. It was a big luxurious area with a bar, an own food place, many tables and of course leather seats exactly on the opposite of the skyline of Indianapolis. From this place you have the best view of the stadium.
The next stop was the part where all journalist and commentators have their seats. There were many TVs and a long table with many chairs from where you had a good side view of the field. Afterwards we went to the highest level with the big glass wall which you can open on very sunny and warm days. Also the roof is going to be open when there is a football game. Then went back to the ground level to walk over the field which was very impressive because I felt so small as I stood on the field and looked up high. The last stops were the Colts changing room, a training room and a press room for interviews.
The changing room was very big and luxurious and the Colts just use it when they have a game because they train l little bit outside of Indiana and not in the stadium. Next to this was a little training room with massage daybeds and a part with ice tubs for treating injuries. In the last room we visited were many seats and a little stage for interviews and we had a lot of fun when some students of our group stood up there and pretended to give an interview.
The tour ended after 2 hours instead of 1. Our nice tourguide made the tour very interesting and answered many questions. She told us that the stadium was opened in August 2008 and has space for 68 000 visitors. Also a very interesting fact was that if a Colt game isn't sold out they will not broadcast it on TV. I guess the Lucas Oil stadium was really the highlight of the day especially because no GAPP group ever got the chance to visit it before.

Ann-Elen Krüger